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Friday, September 2, 2011

Make 12% Interest By Paying Your Florida Real Estate Property Taxes


You Can Get 12% Interest If You Appeal Your Property Taxes In Florida

Call your local banker and see if you can convince them to pay you 12% interest.  No luck???  Well you may still be able to get 12% interest paid by your Florida government.

Newly enacted Florida Statutes Section 194.014(2) states the following in part:
(2) ... If the value adjustment board determines that a refund is due, the overpaid amount accrues interest at the rate of 12 percent per year from the date the taxes became delinquent pursuant to s. 197.333 until a refund is paid. Interest does not accrue on amounts paid in excess of 100 percent of the current taxes due as provided on the tax notice issued pursuant to s. 197.322.
Now more than ever, it can really pay to appeal your real estate property taxes.


In the past, the government charged you interest if you didn't pay your property taxes, but they never paid you interest if you appealed your property taxes and got them reduced.  Now, Florida Statutes Section 194.014 levels the playing field by allowing property owners to obtain 12% interest on any over-payment.


There is no way of proving you overpaid your taxes UNLESS you appeal your taxes!


Filing a petition to appeal your property taxes before the September 19, 2011 Deadline Date is the only way to give yourself a chance to show why you overpaid on your taxes.


THE DEADLINE DATE TO APPEAL YOUR TAXES:
SEPTEMBER 19, 2011


BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE: 
visit our website
or click the banner below
to download the petition form

PTAG Tax Appeal Petition Form

Changes to the Florida Property Tax Appeal System - Time and Cost Management

Creation of Florida Statute 194.014

The State of Florida provides property owners the right to appeal their real estate property tax assessments each year by filing petitions with their county's Value Adjustment Board ("VAB").  The time County VAB's take to complete the appeal process varies, but has dramatically increased in recent years due in part to the following factors:
  • Growing number of petitions;
  • Recent changes in state law and administrative rules; and
  • involvement of property tax representatives such as the Property Tax Appeal Group
In order to change this trend of County VAB's taking longer to complete the property tax appeals each year, the Florida Legislature directed the Office of Program Policy Analysis & Government Accountability ("OPPAGA") to review the Value Adjustment Board process and answer the following four (4) questions:
  1. What is the role of value adjustment boards?
  2. What factors affect the length of the value adjustment board process?
  3. What costs are associated with the value adjustment board process?
  4. What options could the Legislature consider to modify the value adjustment board process?
The OPPAGA published results in their December, 2010 Report No. 10-64.  Within which, the OPPAGA recommends that if the Legislature wishes to make additional changes to the Value Adjustment Board process, it could consider options to:
  1. shorten the process;
  2. address costs and other fiscal implications; and
  3. increase accountability
As a result of the OPPAGA findings, the Florida Legislature drafted and recently passed the following Florida Statute:

1194.014 Partial payment of ad valorem taxes; proceedings before value adjustment board.
(1)(a) A petitioner before the value adjustment board who challenges the assessed value of property must pay all of the non-ad valorem assessments and make a partial payment of at least 75 percent of the ad valorem taxes, less the applicable discount under s. 197.162, before the taxes become delinquent pursuant to s. 197.333.
(b)1. A petitioner before the value adjustment board who challenges the denial of a classification or exemption, or the assessment based on an argument that the property was not substantially complete as of January 1, must pay all of the non-ad valorem assessments and the amount of the tax which the taxpayer admits in good faith to be owing, less the applicable discount under s. 197.162, before the taxes become delinquent pursuant to s. 197.333.
2. If the value adjustment board determines that the amount of the tax that the taxpayer has admitted to be owing pursuant to this paragraph is grossly disproportionate to the amount of the tax found to be due and that the taxpayer’s admission was not made in good faith, the tax collector must collect a penalty at the rate of 10 percent of the deficiency per year from the date the taxes became delinquent pursuant to s. 197.333.
(c) The value adjustment board must deny the petition by written decision by April 20 if the petitioner fails to make the payment required by this subsection. The clerk, upon issuance of the decision, shall, on a form provided by the Department of Revenue, notify by first-class mail each taxpayer, the property appraiser, and the department of the decision of the board.
(2) If the value adjustment board determines that the petitioner owes ad valorem taxes in excess of the amount paid, the unpaid amount accrues interest at the rate of 12 percent per year from the date the taxes became delinquent pursuant to s. 197.333 until the unpaid amount is paid. If the value adjustment board determines that a refund is due, the overpaid amount accrues interest at the rate of 12 percent per year from the date the taxes became delinquent pursuant to s. 197.333 until a refund is paid. Interest does not accrue on amounts paid in excess of 100 percent of the current taxes due as provided on the tax notice issued pursuant to s. 197.322.
(3) This section does not apply to petitions for ad valorem tax deferrals pursuant to chapter 197.

History.s. 1, ch. 2011-181.
1Note.Section 4, ch. 2011-181, provides that “[t]his act shall take effect July 1, 2011, and shall apply to petitions filed with value adjustment boards on or after July 1, 2011.”

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Property Tax Appeal Group Interviewed by CBS 4 News on Property Taxes

In Case You Missed The Interview...


CBS Miami Channel 4 News
Interviews the Property Tax Appeal Group
On Appealing High Property Taxes

Click Image Below to be taken to the CBS 4 website


THE DEADLINE DATE TO APPEAL YOUR TAXES:
SEPTEMBER 19, 2011


BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE: 
visit our website
or click the banner below
to download the petition form

PTAG Tax Appeal Petition Form


Wednesday, August 31, 2011

PTAG Finding Flaws In Artwork and Properties

Can You Point Out The Flaws?



EVEN THE MOST FAMOUS WORKS OF ART CAN CONTAIN PROPERTY DEFECTS
The Property Tax Appeal Group has trained professionals that can identify and point out reasons the County should reduce the property taxes for your home, condo, or commercial property in Miami Dade and Broward County.

THE DEADLINE DATE TO APPEAL YOUR TAXES:
SEPTEMBER 19, 2011


BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE: 
visit our website
or click the banner below
to download the petition form

PTAG Tax Appeal Petition Form

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

What Is The Value Adjustment Board (VAB)?

Value Adjustment Board

Every County within the State of Florida has a Value Adjustment Board, also called the VAB.  The VAB consists of the following five (5) members:
  • Two (2) from the County's Board of Commissioners
  • One (1) from the School Board
  • Two (2) are citizen members
The Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts is the Clerk of the Value Adjustment Board (VAB). The VAB as a panel considers and renders a decision on all appeals of property assessed values, classifications and exemptions. The VAB has no jurisdiction or control over taxes or tax rates established by Taxing Authorities. The VAB's primary function is to hear evidence as to whether or not properties, petitioned for their consideration, are assessed at their proper value and/or whether tax exemptions or agricultural classifications should be approved. The VAB cannot change your assessed value or grant an exemption or agricultural classification for any other reason, such as inability to pay.

The Property Tax Appeal Group (P-TAG) at www.PTAGflorida.com helps real estate property owners file petitions with the VAB and fight to reduce property taxes.

Special Magistrates

To assist the VAB, the VAB appoints Special Magistrates who are either qualified real estate appraisers, personal property appraisers, or attorneys, to conduct hearings and make recommendations to the VAB on all petitions. The primary issue for an Appraiser Special Magistrate to decide is whether or not the assessed value of the petitioned property exceeds its actual market value as of JANUARY 1ST of the relevant tax year. The primary issues to be determined by Attorney Special Magistrates are whether exemptions or agricultural classifications should be granted based on the evidence presented.

Both the VAB and the Special Magistrates are independent of the Property Appraiser's Office. In fact, the Property Appraiser is merely another party before the VAB or the Special Magistrate, just as is the petitioner (taxpayer).

If the VAB decides that it does not agree with the Property Appraiser's Office regarding the assessed value of a petitioner's property, the VAB has the authority to reduce the property’s assessed value to its actual fair market value. If the VAB reduces an assessment within the limits described below, then the Property Appraiser must accept the reduction and may not appeal the VAB decision by filing a suit in the Circuit Court. If, however, the VAB decision results in a reduction exceeding the limits described below, the Property Appraiser may appeal the VAB decision by filing suit in Circuit Court.

How To File Petition With P-TAG To Appeal Your Real Estate Taxes:



STEP 1:
CLICK HERE TO OBTAIN THE AGREEMENT



STEP 2:
Fill out the Agreement and send it back to us either via:
         
          Fax:
          305.693.3497

          Email:
          info@PTAGflorida.com

          Mail:
          Property Tax Appeal Group, LLC
          1060 East 33rd Street, Suite “B”
          Hialeah, Florida 33013


STEP 3:
Send payment of $20 per folio number to our address listed above.  Payment can also be made via email or fax by providing PTAG with your credit card information.

For More Information, please visit us at:
www.PTAGflorida.com

Monday, August 29, 2011

File Your Property Tax Appeal For Your Retail Shopping Center

SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 is the deadline date to appeal your real estate property taxes for your Retail Shopping Center in both Miami Dade and Broward County


For over 30 years, the Property Tax Appeal Group ("P-TAG") and its principals have appealed the real estate (ad valorem) property tax assessment for many retail shopping centers located in both Miami Dade and Broward County.

The Property Tax Appeal Group can handle your retail shopping center tax appeal in both Miami Dade and Broward, as well as for the following types of properties:
  • Apartments
  • Condominiums
  • Houses
  • Industrial Warehouses
  • Land
  • Offices
  • Retail Shopping Centers
Because both Miami Dade and Broward County recently mailed out their proposed tax rates (called a "Truth In Millage Notice" or TRIM Notice) to all property owners, any owner of real estate property located in either Miami Dade or Broward County now has until September 19, 2011 to file petitions to appeal their real estate property tax assessment.

How To File Petition With P-TAG To Appeal Your Real Estate Taxes:




STEP 1:
CLICK HERE TO OBTAIN THE AGREEMENT



STEP 2:
Fill out the Agreement and send it back to us either via:
         
          Fax:
          305.693.3497

          Email:
          info@PTAGflorida.com

          Mail:
          Property Tax Appeal Group, LLC
          1060 East 33rd Street, Suite “B”
          Hialeah, Florida 33013


STEP 3:
Send payment of $20 per folio number to our address listed above.  Payment can also be made via email or fax by providing PTAG with your credit card information.

For More Information, please visit us at:
www.PTAGflorida.com